Gear

Samsung Galaxy Core cell phone

  • 16 November 2016
  • charm
Samsung Galaxy Core phone

For the past couple of years my main cell phone has been the 4 core Samsung Galaxy Core. It's far from the best phone around, but it had a great battery life and did the job for social media. I broke the screen and had it fixed, but within a week the replacement screen started cracking. For a brief time I used an iPhone 5S, which has an amazing camera, but just didn't get the kind of reception I got with the Galaxy Core.

Compaq Deskpro 350 Pentium II

  • 16 November 2016
  • charm
Compaq Deskpro 350 Pentium II (go between computer)

There was a brief period in the early 2000's where I was without a computer. The Athlon XP-based computer some friends had pitched in to put together had a bit the dust. This Pentium II was on sale at XSCargo for $150 and ended up being my temporary replacement. I don't remember if the computer came with an operating system, but I ended up installing Linux on the machine. The KDS monitor was also purchased from XSCargo, but from the shop that existed in downtown Kitchener back when they had the location where Holy Guacamole is now.

Pentium 133MHz PC router firewall

  • 16 November 2016
  • charm
IBM Pentium 133MHz router firewall

Back in my bachelor days I was free to sprawl computers all over the place. One of those computers was this IBM PC Pentium 133MHz computer that served as a firewall for the Pentium 200MHz-based computer from earlier gear posts. It ran Red Hat 7.1 and with the help of John Van Ostrand of Net Direct I had ipchains/iptables set up to block nasty traffic. It was overkill for the single computer I had behind the firewall, but it meant I didn't have my main Linux box directly connected to the Internet (one step removed). The MAG monitor is a whole other story. I used the MAG monitor on several computers over the years. I remember it cost around $300.  I couldn't afford the $500+ NEC CRT monitor so MAG got the nod as one of the best NEC competitors.

Pentium 200MHz running Red Hat Linux 7.3

  • 16 November 2016
  • charm

I don't remember this system too much except that it was a custom build that was a bit better than the PC-based router I was using (a Pentium 133MHz) to route traffic. I believe it had a 200MHz Pentium processor. I don't remember owning a Pentium II, except for a brief period where my future Athlon XP-based system bit the dust, and a Pentium III notebook I bought later. This was the computer where I made the permanent switch from FreeBSD to Linux. I remember having an issue with my HP 712 printer that was a PITA to fix on FreeBSD and simple install on Red Hat Linux. I distinctly remember also installing Mandrake Linux (before it became Mandriva) on this system. It eventually got replaced with an Athlon XP-based system built by a number of friends.

Lenovo 3000 C100

  • 16 November 2016
  • charm

There are a couple of models of the Lenovo 3000 C100 notebook. My notebook came with the base Celeron M 1.5GHz processor, 512MB RAM and an 80GB hard drive. I upgraded the RAM to 2GB and removed Windows XP Home in favour Ubuntu Linux. This was my workhorse notebook for a couple of years. Some reviews of this notebook complain that it's too bulky, but inside that bulk is quality parts. I used the notebook quite a bit for video editing. I'd import video from our video camera via the notebook's mini IEEE1394/Firewire port and edit it with KINO. Although it didn't have a web cam, and it didn't look as cool as the Thinkpads, the 3000 C100 was definitely built right with USB ports spaced out nicely and the rest of the ports in convenient places. Other models of this notebook came with a Pentium M 1.6 and 1.73GHz processor.

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